An Illustrated History of Canada's Native People: I Have Lived Here Since the World Began, Fourth Edition

By Arthur J. Ray

© 2016

Canada’s Native people have inhabited this land since the Ice Age and were already accomplished traders, artisans, farmers, and marine hunters when Europeans first reached their shores. Contact between Natives and European explorers and settlers initially presented an unprecedented period of growth and opportunity. But the two vastly different cultures soon clashed. Arthur Ray charts the history of Canada’s Native people from first contact to current land claims. The result is a fascinating chronicle that spans 12,000 years and culminates in the headlines of today. In the preface to this new edition, Ray elaborates on the increasing effectiveness of Indigenous peoples and their leaders in bringing demands for justice to centre stage. He discusses recent court decisions, the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, and the hope for change following promises made by the new Trudeau government.
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Product Details

  • Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
  • Page Count: 464 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.9in x 1.1in x 9.3in
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SKU# DT012301

  • PUBLISHED MAY 2016
    From: $39.95
    ISBN 9780773548008

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The history of Canada's Native people from first contact to current land claims. The result is a fascinating chronicle that spans 12,000 years and culminates in the headlines of today.

An Illustrated History of Canada's Native People: I Have Lived Here Since the World Began, Fourth Edition

By Arthur J. Ray

© 2016

Canada’s Native people have inhabited this land since the Ice Age and were already accomplished traders, artisans, farmers, and marine hunters when Europeans first reached their shores. Contact between Natives and European explorers and settlers initially presented an unprecedented period of growth and opportunity. But the two vastly different cultures soon clashed. Arthur Ray charts the history of Canada’s Native people from first contact to current land claims. The result is a fascinating chronicle that spans 12,000 years and culminates in the headlines of today. In the preface to this new edition, Ray elaborates on the increasing effectiveness of Indigenous peoples and their leaders in bringing demands for justice to centre stage. He discusses recent court decisions, the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, and the hope for change following promises made by the new Trudeau government.
Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
  • Page Count: 464 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.9in x 1.1in x 9.3in
".. provides the general reader with a useful introduction to many aspects of Aboriginal Canada’s history … The many well-chosen illustrations complement the text superbly." - The Globe and Mail
"[E]ngaging … a familiar story retold firmly from the original inhabitants’ point of view. Chock full of hundreds of photos, drawings, and maps, many in vivid colour, this handsome book is the ideal primer." - The Toronto Star
"Written in an easy-flowing, conversational manner, it is both eye-opening and controversial." - The Saskatoon Star Phoenix
"Written in clear language and comprehensively illustrated … is an excellent introduction to the history of the relationship between Canada’s Native people and the various European governments they encountered." - The Kitchener-Waterloo Record
"Intriguing and provocative. This is not the kind of book destined to gather dust on the shelf." - Canada’s History
"In keeping with Ray’s standing as one of the leading historians of Canada, it is a resolutely materialist history which examines the labouring lives of Native people in the modern era as comprehensively as their pre-colonial life." - University of Toront
Arthur J. Ray is professor emeritus of history at the University of British Columbia and author of Aboriginal Rights Claims and the Making and Remaking of History and Telling It to the Judge: Taking Native History to Court.