Birds of Costa Rica: A Field Guide

By and and

© 2010

At the biological crossroads of the Americas, Costa Rica hosts an astonishing array of plants and animals—over half a million species! Ecotourists, birders, and biologists come from around the world, drawn by the likelihood of seeing more than three or four hundred species of birds and other animals during even a short stay. To help all of these visitors, as well as local residents, identify and enjoy the wildlife of Costa Rica, Carrol Henderson published Field Guide to the Wildlife of Costa Rica in 2002, and it became the instant and indispensable guide.

Now Henderson has created a dedicated field guide to the birds that travelers are most likely to see, as well as to the unique or endemic species that are of high interest to birders. Birds of Costa Rica covers 310 birds—an increase of 124 species from the earlier volume—with fascinating accounts of the birds' natural history, identification, and behavior gleaned from Henderson's forty years of traveling and birding in Costa Rica. All of the accounts include beautiful photographs of the birds, most of which were taken in the wild by Henderson. There are new updated distribution maps and a detailed appendix that identifies many of the country's best bird-watching locations and lodges, including contact information for trip planning purposes.

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Product Details

  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • Page Count: 403 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.8in x 1.1in x 8.3in
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  • PUBLISHED FEB 2010
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    ISBN 9780292719651

Birds of Costa Rica: A Field Guide

By and and

© 2010

At the biological crossroads of the Americas, Costa Rica hosts an astonishing array of plants and animals—over half a million species! Ecotourists, birders, and biologists come from around the world, drawn by the likelihood of seeing more than three or four hundred species of birds and other animals during even a short stay. To help all of these visitors, as well as local residents, identify and enjoy the wildlife of Costa Rica, Carrol Henderson published Field Guide to the Wildlife of Costa Rica in 2002, and it became the instant and indispensable guide.

Now Henderson has created a dedicated field guide to the birds that travelers are most likely to see, as well as to the unique or endemic species that are of high interest to birders. Birds of Costa Rica covers 310 birds—an increase of 124 species from the earlier volume—with fascinating accounts of the birds' natural history, identification, and behavior gleaned from Henderson's forty years of traveling and birding in Costa Rica. All of the accounts include beautiful photographs of the birds, most of which were taken in the wild by Henderson. There are new updated distribution maps and a detailed appendix that identifies many of the country's best bird-watching locations and lodges, including contact information for trip planning purposes.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • Page Count: 403 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.8in x 1.1in x 8.3in
Carrol L. Henderson has headed the Nongame Wildlife Program of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources since 1977. He is an award-winning wildlife conservationist who has helped bring back eastern bluebirds, bald eagles, peregrine falcons, river otters, and trumpeter swans; an avid wildlife photographer whose images have appeared in the New York Times, Audubon, Birder's World, and Wild Bird; an experienced birding tour leader to Latin America, Kenya, Tanzania, and New Zealand; and the author of many magazine articles and several books. In 2016, the Garden Club of America awarded Henderson the Frances K. Hutchinson Medal, which is given to figures of national importance for distinguished service to conservation. In 2012, he received the Gary T. Myers Bird Conservation Award from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, recognizing him as the top bird conservationist in North America.
  • Foreword by Alexander F. Skutch
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
    • Historical Perspective
    • Research
    • Education
    • Preservation
    • Conservation
    • Nature Tourism
    • Geography
    • Biogeography
    • Migratory Birds
    • Endemic Species
    • Endemic Wildlife of the Highlands
    • Endemic Species of the Southern Pacific Lowlands
    • Endemic Species of Cocos Island
    • Major Biological Zones
    • Tropical Dry Forest
    • Southern Pacific Lowlands
    • Central Plateau (Central Valley)
    • Caribbean Lowlands
    • Highlands
    • Coastal Beaches, Islands, and Mangrove Lagoons
    • Wildlife Overview and Species Coverage
  • Bird Species Accounts
    • Tinamou Family (Tinamidae)
    • Duck Family (Anatidae)
    • Chachalaca, Guan, and Curassow Family (Cracidae)
    • Booby Family (Sulidae)
    • Pelican Family (Pelecanidae)
    • Cormorant Family (Phalacrocoracidae)
    • Anhinga Family (Anhingidae)
    • Frigatebird Family (Fregatidae)
    • Heron Family (Ardeidae)
    • Ibis and Spoonbill Family (Threskiornithidae)
    • Stork Family (Ciconiidae)
    • American Vulture Family (Cathartidae)
    • Osprey Family (Pandionidae)
    • Accipiter Family (Accipitridae)
    • Falcon Family (Falconidae)
    • Rail Family (Rallidae)
    • Sungrebe Family (Heliornithidae)
    • Sunbittern Family (Eurypygidae)
    • Thick-knee Family (Burhinidae)
    • Plover Family (Charadriidae)
    • Oystercatcher Family (Haematopodidae)
    • Stilt Family (Recurvirostridae)
    • Jacana Family (Jacanidae)
    • Sandpiper Family (Scolopacidae)
    • Gull and Tern Family (Laridae)
    • Dove and Pigeon Family (Columbidae)
    • Parrot Family (Psittacidae)
    • Cuckoo Family (Cuculidae)
    • Owl Family (Strigidae)
    • Nighthawk Family (Caprimulgidae)
    • Potoo Family (Nyctibiidae)
    • Hummingbird Family (Trochilidae)
    • Trogon Family (Trogonidae)
    • Motmot Family (Momotidae)
    • Kingfisher Family (Alcedinidae)
    • Puffbird Family (Bucconidae)
    • Jacamar Family (Galbulidae)
    • Toucan Family (Ramphastidae)
    • Woodpecker Family (Picidae)
    • Spinetail Family (Furnariidae)
    • Woodcreeper Family (Dendrocolaptidae)
    • Antbird Family (Thamnophilidae)
    • Flycatcher Family (Tyrannidae)
    • Tityra and Becard Family (Tityridae)
    • Cotinga Family (Cotingidae)
    • Manakin Family (Pipridae)
    • Vireo Family (Vireonidae)
    • Jay Family (Corvidae)
    • Swallow Family (Hirundinidae)
    • Wren Family (Troglodytidae)
    • Dipper Family (Cinclidae)
    • Thrush and Robin Family (Turdidae)
    • Silky-Flycatcher Family (Ptilogonatidae)
    • Wood-Warbler Family (Parulidae)
    • Bananaquit Family (Coerebidae)
    • Tanager Family (Thraupidae)
    • Seedeater, Finch, and Sparrow Family (Emberizidae)
    • Saltator and Grosbeak Family (Cardinalidae)
    • Blackbird, Oriole, and Grackle Family (Icteridae)
    • Goldfinch, Euphonia, and Chlorophonia Family (Fringillidae)
  • Glossary
  • Bibliography
  • Appendix A. Costa Rica Conservation Organizations, Research Stations, Birding Groups, and Bird Information Sources
  • Appendix B. Wildlife Tourism Sites and Field Stations Referred to in the Distribution Maps
  • Appendix C. Costa Rican Trip Preparation Checklist
  • Appendix D. Travel Tips for a Successful Wildlife Viewing Trip in Costa Rica
  • Appendix E. Eco-misconceptions about Bird Feeding, Flash Photography, and Sound Recordings
  • About the Author
  • Index