From Where I Stand: Rebuilding Indigenous Nations for a Stronger Canada

By Jody Wilson-Raybould

© 2019

An Indigenous leader who has dedicated her life to Indigenous Rights, Jody Wilson-Raybould has represented both First Nations and the Crown at the highest levels. And she is not afraid to give Canadians what they need most – straight talk on what has to be done to move beyond our colonial legacy and achieve true reconciliation in Canada. In this powerful book, drawn from speeches and other writings, she urges all Canadians – both Indigenous and non-Indigenous – to build upon the momentum already gained or risk hard-won progress being lost. The good news is that Indigenous Nations already have the solutions. But now is the time to act and build a shared postcolonial future based on the foundations of trust, cooperation, recognition, and good governance.
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Product Details

  • Publisher: UBC Press
  • Page Count: 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.8in x 0.8in x 9.0in
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SKU# DT014410

  • PUBLISHED SEP 2019
    From: $24.95
    ISBN 9780774880534

Quick Overview

Jody Wilson-Raybould outlines in impassioned, inspiring prose the actions that must be taken by governments, Indigenous Nations, and all Canadians to achieve true reconciliation in this country.

From Where I Stand: Rebuilding Indigenous Nations for a Stronger Canada

By Jody Wilson-Raybould

© 2019

An Indigenous leader who has dedicated her life to Indigenous Rights, Jody Wilson-Raybould has represented both First Nations and the Crown at the highest levels. And she is not afraid to give Canadians what they need most – straight talk on what has to be done to move beyond our colonial legacy and achieve true reconciliation in Canada. In this powerful book, drawn from speeches and other writings, she urges all Canadians – both Indigenous and non-Indigenous – to build upon the momentum already gained or risk hard-won progress being lost. The good news is that Indigenous Nations already have the solutions. But now is the time to act and build a shared postcolonial future based on the foundations of trust, cooperation, recognition, and good governance.
Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Publisher: UBC Press
  • Page Count: 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.8in x 0.8in x 9.0in

From Where I Stand is a must-read book for all Canadians. Puglaas shares a clear understanding of where we have come from, the issues we must address, and the pathways to a transformed future. Having witnessed her remarkable courage and capacity as Canada’s attorney general and her determination to do what is right without succumbing to unrelenting political pressure, Puglaas stands tall among Canadians as a person for whom truth, thoughtfulness, and principle are not mere words – but values to sustain a different kind of policy and politics.


Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond (Aki-Kwe), Professor of Law, Allard Law School UBC, and Director of the Residential School History and Dialogue Centre
Jody Wilson-Raybould’s quest for justice has long driven her work. I first saw this when she was a law student and this commitment to justice has only been deepened by subsequent public service. Her unwavering commitment to reconciliation, balance, and good governance springs off every page of this book.
John Borrows, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law, University of Victoria Law School

JWR is on target. This must-read book speaks about our journey to an Indigenous Quiet Revolution.


Ghislain Picard, Regional Chief, Assembly of First Nations Quebec and Labrador
Jody Wilson-Raybould was not only born to be a leader but accepted the role as her responsibility, and she has fulfilled it with honour and grace and courage. There is no one better-suited to reflect on the shared future of Canada and what needs to be done to make reconciliation a reality in this country.
from the foreword by The Honourable Murray Sinclair, member of the Senate of Canada, and former Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

Canadians came to understand Jody Wilson-Raybould’s passion and commitment for judicial and political reform through her work as the federal Minister of Justice. Behind her engagement in the cut and thrust of politics, however, lay one of the country’s most informed and thoughtful minds. In this much-anticipated book, Wilson-Raybould explains the cultural and historical roots of Indigenous hurt, anger, and despair. But true to her nature, she also offers the country a practical, reasonable, and viable path towards real and lasting reconciliation. This is a brilliant view of what is both possible and necessary.


Ken Coates, Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation, and co-author of From Treaty Peoples to Treaty Nation: A Road Map for All Canadians

Writing from both the Big House and the House on Parliament Hill, Jody Wilson-Raybould offers unique and profound perspectives from two worlds. In this book, she maps out how First Nations can overcome the struggles of the colonial world and move toward a self-determined future in a world that is better for all. Jody’s vision is clear, and her voice is essential for understanding the urgency needed for colonial and First Nations governments to develop both the political will and the commitment to action needed for a better Canada.


Terry Teegee, Regional Chief, British Columbia Assembly of First Nations

Foreword | Senator Murray Sinclair

Introduction

Moving through the Postcolonial Door

We Truly Have Come a Long Way ...

Idle No More and Recapturing the Spirit and Intent of the Two Row Wampum

On the Parallels, and Differences, between Canada and South Africa

Our Shared Histories and the Path of Reconciliation

Rights and Recognition

Friduciary Gridlock and the Inherent Right of Self-Government

Translating Hard-Fought-For Rights into Practical and Meaningful Benefits

UNDRIP Is the Start, Not the Finishing Line

Defining the Path of Reconciliation through Section 35

Indigenous Rights Are Human Rights

Implementing UNDRIP

Governance in the Post-Indian Act World

Toppling the Indian Act Tree

First Nations Jurisdiction over Citizenship

Holding and Managing Our Lands

On Accountability and Transparency

Developing a New Fiscal Relationship

The Governance Toolkit and Building on OUR Success

Building Business Relationships and the Duty to Consult

Economic Development Depends on Self-Government

First Nations Are Not a Box to Tick Off

Who Owns and Is Responsible for the Water?

On Certainty and Why It’s Elusive

Restoring Balance, Correcting Injustices, and Remaining Vigilant

A Litmus Test for Reconciliation Is the Status of Women

Preventing First Contacts with the Criminal Justice System

On Sticking Our Necks Out

On Obstruction, Denial, and Canada’s Failure to Uphold the Rule of Law

Each of Us, In Our Own Way, Is a Hiligax̱ste’

Acknowledgments

A Note on Terminology and the Speeches

Case Law and Legislation Cited

Index